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Dallas BBQ recipes and reviews

Monthly Archives: August 2012

Turkey in a Smoker

Ingredients

1 (10 pound) whole turkey, neck and giblets removed
4 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tablespoons seasoned salt
1/2 cup butter
2 (12 fluid ounce) cans cola-flavored carbonated beverage
1 apple, quartered
1 onion, quartered
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
Directions

Preheat smoker to 225 to 250 degrees F (110 to 120 degrees C).
Rinse turkey under cold water, and pat dry. Rub the crushed garlic over the outside of the bird, and sprinkle with seasoned salt. Place in a disposable roasting pan. Fill turkey cavity with butter, cola, apple, onion, garlic powder, salt, and ground black pepper. Cover loosely with foil.
Smoke at 225 to 250 degrees F (110 to 120 degrees C) for 10 hours, or until internal temperature reaches 180 degrees F (80 degrees C) when measured in the thickest part of the thigh. Baste the bird every 1 to 2 hours with the juices from the bottom of the roasting pan.

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

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Kids Eat Free at Big Racks BBQ in Grapevine

Every Weekend!

Every Saturday and Sunday, Kids eat FREE!

– ONE free kid’s meal and drink per adult entree
– Kids must be under 12 years old!

Address: 1720 State Hwy 26 Grapevine, TX 76051
Tel: 972-539-5511

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

Side item secrets for barbecues

Tired of serving the same old mayonnaise-based salads and side dishes? If you are having a barbecue for Father’s Day this weekend, try something new.

With the much-welcomed summer season about to start, Garden State grillers should know that a broad range of fresh, innovative and tasty side dish options can help transform their barbecues from standard to sensational.

Read more

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

Wholly Cow! A Few Brave Grillers Go ‘Nose-to-Tail’

GREENVILLE, S.C.—When Jeff Bannister, owner of a process-serving company here, decided four months ago to grill a whole steer, he was prepared for challenges.

It was expensive—the steer alone, skinned and butterflied, cost about $2,000—and at 863 pounds, it took six men to heave it out of the slaughterhouse and onto a truck. The grill, which Mr. Bannister and friends designed, required a 14-foot-long rack, a three-ton chain hoist and tube steel buried five feet in 3,000 pounds of concrete. The weather report for the all-night, April cookout predicted torrential rain and possible tornados.

Then the steer caught on fire.

“I wasn’t expecting that,” yelled Mr. Bannister, 46 years old, who grabbed a hose and began putting out the flames, then spritzed the steer with a solution of wine, water and salt. His friend Randall Knight, owner of Nard’s Backyard BBQ catering company, covered his eyes, muttering something about how spraying alcohol over a fire wasn’t a good idea. Tension rippled through the crowd of 30 onlookers.

Whole-animal cookery has grown trendy in recent years, as celebrity chefs including Mario Batali and Britain’s Fergus Henderson, have promoted “nose-to- tail” eating. But while whole pigs, lambs or goats have hitherto represented the apex of carnivorous grilling, few in modern-day America have attempted whole-cattle roasts. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association says it has never heard of such a thing.

In recent months, however, there’s been a smattering of interest in roasting whole bovines. In December, Jerry Wallach, an attorney and Marine, and his girlfriend, Alanna Kellogg, who writes food blogs, gathered 150 friends in the Missouri Ozarks where they roasted an “875-pound on the hoof” buffalo. In Austin, Texas, last September, John Bullington, executive chef of the Alamo Drafthouse, a chain of cinemas that serve meals, grilled a head of cattle for a company event.

These roasters, and Mr. Bannister, say they were inspired by a cookbook published two years ago by chef Francis Mallmann, who has restaurants in Argentina and Uruguay. In his book, “Seven Fires,” he describes a method for grilling a cow in the style of South American gauchos. The recipe calls for “1 medium cow, about 1,400 pounds, butterflied, skin removed” and “1 heavy block-and-tackle attached to a steel stanchion set in concrete.”

Mr. Bannister saw Mr. Mallmann demonstrate a cattle roast in Uruguay on Anthony Bourdain’s “No Reservations” TV show last year. He instantly began dreaming about doing it.

“He said, ‘It’s never been done here before,'” recalled his wife, Olga Bannister. “And I said, ‘Ok, but why would you want to do it?'”

Mr. Bannister says he’s gone through other food obsessions, including perfecting paella. But he says a steer roast represented both “a bucket-list type of thing” and a way to gather friends, clients and employees.

Grilling a steer presents problems that cooking smaller animals doesn’t. Cuts of beef, more than pork or lamb, differ in terms of tenderness and flavor, and require distinct cooking temperatures and methods, says Mark Elia, a lecturer on meat fabrication at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. A cattle carcass has a thick layer of fat that liquefies over heat and causes flare ups.

Even the author has qualms.

“It’s not the most delicious thing, I must confess,” says Mr. Mallmann. “You’re cooking a huge beast: Some parts will be nice, and some will be overcooked,” he says. In Argentina and Uruguay, whole-cow cookery is largely ceremonial, he says, for events such as fairs celebrating rural culture. He never thought U.S. readers would try it.

Some object. When Catie Coyle, a 23-year-old social worker in Greenville, was told by her boyfriend that they were invited to Mr. Bannister’s roast, she was “completely and utterly appalled,” she says. Thankfully, she says, the event was “not quite as horrific and graphic as I expected.”

A big roadblock to cattle grilling is that neither the equipment nor a local knowledge base are readily available. Each U.S. group had to engineer and build its own grill. There wasn’t always such a vacuum: A newspaper report from 1878 tells of a political gathering in Shoemakersville, Pa., where the public was served a whole roasted ox. It describes how the event descended into a stampede as crowds rushed the ox meat.

Vestiges of this tradition can be observed in community “Ox Roasts,” though most feature cuts of butchered beef rather than whole oxen.

In spite of drawbacks, some describe being inexorably drawn to cattle-roasting.

“I was drinking a nice French wine with a bunch of hairy-chested Marines,” during an elk-hunting trip last fall when friends talked him into grilling a buffalo, Mr. Wallach, 72, recalls. Two months later, he was driving a tractor carrying a 419-pound cleaned carcass towards a modified spit roast. The meat emerged “a bit crispy” in places, “a bit rare” in others, but still tasty, he says.

A group of local businessmen shared the costs and labor of Mr. Bannister’s roast—christened “Bovinova 2011″—and a 69-member Facebook group shared tips, such as how to make three gallons of horseradish sauce. The event was streamed via a webcam, drawing 350 viewers.

No amount of camaraderie, however, could spare Mr. Bannister, who served in Desert Storm, “the worst night of my life,” as a storm raged across the Carolinas all night during his roast. The crowd thinned to 10 exhausted helpers and the steer was consumed by flames multiple times. After 18 hours on the grill, the meat emerged thoroughly carbonized, looking like a tree trunk after a forest fire. But once the black exterior was cut away, the skies cleared, a band played, and about 300 people sat down and ate juicy beef, beans and coleslaw. Mr. Bannister and his team began planning the next Bovinova. Mrs. Bannister marveled that they pulled it off.

“I just think, given enough bourbon, these guys could solve all the problems of the world,” she said.

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

Eastern North Carolina BBQ Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce (e.g. Tabasco™), or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Combine the white vinegar, cider vinegar, brown sugar, cayenne pepper, hot pepper sauce, salt and pepper in a jar or bottle with a tight-fitting lid. Refrigerate for 1 to 2 days before using so that the flavors will blend. Shake occasionally, and store for up to 2 months in the refrigerator.

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

Dallas Ultimate Barbecued Chicken

Ingredients
Brine:

2 quarts water
2 tablespoons kosher salt
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 garlic cloves, smashed with the side of a large knife
4 sprigs fresh thyme
6 chicken legs and thighs, still connected, bone in, skin on, about 10 ounces each

The Ultimate Barbecue Sauce:

1 slice bacon
1 bunch fresh thyme
Extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 cups ketchup
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup molasses
2 tablespoons red or white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon paprika or smoked paprika if available
Freshly ground black pepper

Directions

For the brine, in a mixing bowl combine the water, salt, sugar, garlic, and thyme. Transfer the brine to a 2-gallon sized re-sealable plastic bag. Add the chicken, close the bag and refrigerate 2 hours (if you’ve only got 15 minutes, that’s fine) to allow the salt and seasonings to penetrate the chicken.

Meanwhile, make the sauce. Wrap the bacon around the bunch of thyme and tie with kitchen twine so you have a nice bundle. Heat about 2 tablespoons of oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the thyme and cook slowly 3 to 4 minutes to render the bacon fat and give the sauce a nice smoky taste. Add the onion and garlic and cook slowly without coloring for 5 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients, give the sauce a stir, and turn the heat down to low. Cook slowly for 20 minutes to meld the flavors. Once the sauce is done cooking, remove about 1 1/2 cups of the sauce and reserve for serving along side the chicken at the table. The rest of the barbecue sauce will be used for basing the legs.

Preheat oven 375 degrees F.

Preheat a grill pan or an outdoor gas or charcoal barbecue to a medium heat. Take a few paper towels and fold them several times to make a thick square. Blot a small amount of oil on the paper towel and carefully and quickly wipe the hot grates of the grill to make a nonstick surface. Take the chicken out of the brine, pat it dry on paper towels. Arrange the chicken pieces on the preheated grill and cook, turn once mid-way, and cook for a total of 10 minutes. Transfer the grill marked chicken to a cookie sheet and then place in the oven. Cook the chicken for 15 minutes, remove it from the oven and then brush liberally, coating every inch of the legs with the barbecue sauce and then return to the oven for 25 to 30 more minutes, basting the chicken for a second time half way through remaining cooking time. Serve with extra sauce.

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

BBQ Bananas Honey Lime

Ingredients:

4 firm ripe bananas
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 tablespoon honey
cooking spray
vanilla ice cream (optional) or pudding (optional)

Directions:

Prep Time: 10 mins Total Time: 15 mins

1 Peel bananas.
2 Halve lengthways.
3 Spray with the cooking spray.
4 Combine honey and lime juice in a small bowl, and set aside.
5 Prepare grill, and upon reaching 350 degrees, place bananas on grill cut side down.
6 Grill for 2 minutes, brush with the honey lime sauce, turn.
7 Grill for 2 minutes on round side, brush with remaining sauce.
8 Serve and enjoy!

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

UFC 150 at Big Racks BBQ in Grapevine

Come catch the fight with us on any of our 23 HD TVs and 2 projection screens!!!

NO COVER CHARGE!!!
GREAT SERVICE!!!
AWARD WINNING BBQ!!!
PLENTY OF SEATING!!!!

HAPPY HOUR 2-7 (2 domestic pints,$3.50 wells,$7 domestic pitchers, and $1 off liquor) FOLLOWED BY OUR LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR(2 domestic pints and $3 wells)

Big Racks BBQ – 1720 State Hwy 26, Grapevine, Texas 76051

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

Dallas Cowboys: Predicting Production for Dez Bryant and Seven Other Receivers

The Dallas Cowboys are uniquely positioned to harvest a fantastic breakout year from Dez Bryant and Miles Austin or fall back on a productive committee of receivers, should more problems crop up with Bryant’s head and Austin’s hamstrings.

Thus far in training camp, the reviews are glowing for Bryant, but Austin’s hamstrings are indeed acting out. The Cowboys are being exceedingly cautious with Austins latest mild strain and are anticipating his return soon.

Provided there are no major issues with these starting wide outs, here are my predictions for their production in 2012, along with several other Cowboys receivers:

Dez Bryant: 1,380 yards

This is Bryant’s breakout year. Reports from OTA’s and now training camp say that he has a much better grasp of the offense and the route trees he is responsible for. His physical ability has never been questioned and it now appears as though his mental approach to the game has improved substantially. Off the field is another matter.

Jason Witten: 1,000 yards

Witten is the most reliable receiver the Cowboys have had since Michael Irvin. He is a consummate professional.

Read More

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ

Dallas Cowboys Claiborne sprains MCL

OXNARD, Calif. — A team source told ESPN’s Ed Werder on Saturday that Dallas Cowboys‘ first-round pick Morris Claiborne is expected to miss a few practices after suffering a minor MCL knee sprain.

Team officials didn’t believe the injury was serious, but scheduled Claiborne for an MRI on the sore right knee after Friday’s practice.

“He had a little twinge there in his knee and our trainers thought it would be best to give him the afternoon off,” team owner/general manager Jerry Jones said. “At this time we are not concerned.”

Read More

Dallas Wedding Caterers offer their services for special events including Weddings and Ring Ceremonies.
Dallas BBQ Catering also provides perfect BBQ food, reasonably priced and presented in the authentic Texan style.
Call: 972-741-8864 to discuss your Dallas BBQ catering needs
The Finest BBQ & Sports Grill in Grapevine is Big Racks BBQ